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Knowledge Sharing and the British Culture

Nick Milton is doing some really interesting stuff about the cultural issues of Knowledge Sharing on his blog

Below is Nick’s take on us Brits.  Do you think he is right when it comes to Knowledge Sharing and Knowledge Management?

The United Kingdom

Northern Europeans are very open to knowledge management, and the UK is no exception. The British are very willing to learn from experience, but somehow more willing to analyse failures than successes. There is a British unwillingness to “show off”, and a national tendency to explore things that have gone wrong.

Knowledge Management and learning from experience will, if you are not careful, tend to focus on problems and challenges, and the knowledge manager will need to work quite hard at times to get people to recognise success, and learn from it.

However the northern European fondness for process is a good supporter of the Lessons Learned process, and other project-based KM activities. Communities of practice work well in the British culture as a mechanism for problem-solving, as people are very open to asking other for help, and open to sharing their problems and challenges. The “not invented here” syndrome can be strong, and the knowledge manager needs to be very aware of this, and how it may be addressed.
Read more: Knoco stories: KM and national culture 1 – UK and Thailand/Malaysia http://www.nickmilton.com/2011/03/km-and-national-culture-1-uk-and.html#ixzz1JP4rRZGZ

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