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Posts Tagged ‘social networking’

Is the writing on your wall?

April 1, 2010 Leave a comment

In the past I have mentioned that I was part of a research project at the Henley Knowledge Management Forum.  For some reason they choose me as a Co-Champion, probably a big mistake.

The Project was based on the question of Does using social networking sites affect knowledge sharing and creation at work?

The research paper looked at the effects of using social networking websites on work-related knowledge sharing.

When it came to social networking websites we looked at use at work, at home or on the move. As our focus was on the use of social networking websites to build and maintain relationships that might lead to work related knowledge sharing.

We also noted that the communication mechanism for the knowledge sharing itself might not be the social networking website, and the relationships might not be work-related when they first develop.

In the paper we concentrated on

  1. Do people use social networking websites to build and maintain relationships that lead to work related knowledge sharing?
  2. What are the benefits of using social networking websites?
  3. What are the pitfalls of using social networking websites?
  4. How do the benefits and pitfalls of using social networking websites compare with the benefits and pitfalls of using other networking methods to build and maintain relationships?

In reality we only scratched the surface on this subject and there is still so much more that can be done.

As you can see by the guidance slideshow that was produced.

Firstly I would like to thank everyone who particpated in the research and big thank you to Judy Payne and Nick Silburn

And if you have any thoughts I would love to hear from you.

Public sector still closed to social media

January 22, 2010 Leave a comment

Socitm say that 67% of Local Authorities have a total ban on use of Social Networking sites http://www.ukauthority.com/?tabid=64&id=2686

The Society of Information Technology Management (Socitm) says its findings show that most ICT managers in the public sector restrict or even block social networks.

The public sector needs to exploit social networking as no-one ‘can afford to ignore the potential’ according to a new report.

By doing this they’re taking the wrong attitude to something that could improve the company.

The report has revealed that 90 per cent of public sector bodies restrict social networking in some way, while over two-thirds cut employees off from it completely.

ICT managers need to look at how social media may help deal with budget issues by ‘engaging citizens, delivering services, and empowering employees in new ways of working’, the firm says.

And we can’t ignore social media. The report boldly states: “Failure to engage with the trend is tantamount to decrying the telephone at the end of the 19th century.”

There a nice little video report on the Chartered Institute for IT http://www.bcs.org/server.php?show=conWebDoc.34115. That’s if you’re allowed to see it.

I find the results of this frustrating, where there is a big push from central government to connect people and data.

Of course I’m going to say look at some of the benefits that are coming from IDeA’s Communities of Practice platform, but also with the release of www.data.gov.uk

The potential is there.

All we need to do is train and encourage the use.  I know the report boldly states: “Failure to engage with the trend is tantamount to decrying the telephone at the end of the 19th century.”

And it took around 30-40 years before the telephone was seen as the norm, actually probably longer.  And I’m wondering was anyone shown how to use the telephone, or was this done by word of mouth (sorry bad joke).

With email it took 7-8 years to become the norm, so how many of you have been on email training.  I’m guessing most of you.

So where’s the plan to teach social media and social networking.  Only a few organisations are thinking about that or have started.

How long before the rest catch up?  Now that’s my question

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