What happens when PMO’s and KM people get together?

June 9, 2014 2 comments

We all love an acronym.  So it’s always nice when you get to areas of work who love to use them together and have a chat.

I attended a joint APM SIG yesterday between the Knowledge SIG and The Project/Programme/Portfolio Management Office SIG.

Using a technique based on the World Café approach and hosted by Lindsay Scott form the PMO SIG.  Lindsay tweets at https://twitter.com/projectmgmt

We had four topics to discuss as groups.  Covering

 

  • 21st Century Joy – Old-fashioned Knowledge Management – how can we move it from the 1990s to the 21st Century?
  • Knowledge Opportunity Knocks- PMOs and Knowledge Management – what are the biggest opportunities?
  • K to the M to the PMO – Knowledge Management in the PMO – what it is and what it isn’t
  • Lessons Recorded – Lessons learnt – the BIG knowledge management myth

There was a great buzz and lots of conversation.

These are just some of the highlights that came out of the discussions

21st Century Joy

  • Little differences makes a big difference when knowledge sharing
  • How to find quality in the volume
  • KM needs to follow the organisations evolution

Knowledge Opportunity Knocks

  • New skills in content curation and knowledge marketing
  • Better to live of peoples experiences rather than peoples paper
  • Quantifying the benefits of knowledge sharing

K to the M to the PMO

  • PMO is the network, try and avoid the silos
  • A PMO’s role is to facilitate between departments
  • Disseminator of process lessons

Lessons Recorded

  • The power of positive stories (including what went wrong)
  • True learning takes time
  • Keep technology simple to help

How I used a Knowledge Marketplace and Ideas factory to generate community activities.

May 29, 2014 Leave a comment

Idea FactoryI’ve used a Knowledge Management technique called a Marketplace to help at the start of building communities in the past.

Using two simple questions.

  • What they want from the community
  • What can they offer the community

This normally helps identify the topics of interest to the group and what they already know.  Allowing you to create some quick wins and match people and the knowledge up and share this to the wider community.  Giving the group a great kick-start.

So taking this idea to a more established community I combined the marketplace exercise with an Ideas factory tool.  (A tool that allows members to vote and comment on the idea)

At the end of 2013 I sat down and asked the members of the community what they would like to do for the next 12 months.  Using the Knowledge Marketplace technique originally in a forum I asked members what they could offer and what they wanted from the community.

This resulted in a considerable number of want and offers which we then took into a wiki and started to theme them.  This gave us 9 activities to work towards from the year.  And importantly members who would like to help out.

These 9 activities where added to the Ideas factory and members were asked to vote on the priority of these activities.

We have only completed 3 activities out of the 9 so far.  But each one of these has been led by members of the community.

Two webinars sharing their experience on a particular topic and the other the creation of an editable flyer that everyone can use.

I’m looking forward to seeing how the other 6 activities come together.

We really need to talk about knowledge management…

May 12, 2014 Leave a comment

Another great Courageous conversation hosted by Judy Payne.

Judy talks about Knowledge Management today can mean anything from information management through to crowdsourcing

But project management knowledge management still focuses on collecting knowledge, writing it down and adding it to lessons learn databases.

Judy asks is project management KM stuck in the 1990s?

I would have to agree.  You can join the discussion on the video on Linkedin

Do you have a plan for when your community manager moves on?

April 8, 2014 Leave a comment

transferring......So your community manger is moving on.  You ask them to write handover notes.  You get a list of social media accounts that they use and they move to a new job.

Will the community survive? Probably not.

Most online communities have one real driving force behind it.  And you have missed the opportunity to hand the baton over to other people.

It’s the conversation that is normally missed out and it makes such a big difference and identifies so much more than you can write down.

This happens a lot in organisations when someone moves jobs, it’s only an afterthought.

There becomes a Knowledge Gap.  I heard that it normally takes 18 months for a new employee to become profitable to the organisation and for them to be fully integrated with the way of work.

Can you afford that time delay in an online community?  And would the members be happy with someone new just turning up without an introduction?

If you get a chance just do a search on Knowledge Retention and Transfer.  There’s some great stuff out there that will help you start the conversation if your community manager is about to move on.

Creating a playbook for Community Managers

February 24, 2014 Leave a comment

Madden '96There are some great community playbooks out there that take you through the establishing and launching of your community with a few tips on how to keep it going.

Such as Cisco’s Community Playbook, Salesforce’s Community Playbook and DNN’s Community Playbook

One of the things that there are an abundance of material on is the creating of an online community or community of practice.  But there’s not so much on how to really facilitate the activity in the community and help it thrive.

What techniques, what tactics can use you to help move your community forward?

For me the word Playbook goes back to the days of playing John Madden on my Sega Mega Drive.

And the three key elements

  • Offense
  • Defence
  • Special Teams

Can you take those elements in to Community Management and create techniques to help your community?

If you did, what techniques or tactics would you use for the below?

Offensive plays would be all about breaking down the boundaries of the community and moving it forward. You will be looking to increase the number of discussions and participating members.

Improve the quality of the conversations and content, and encourage better relationships between the members.

Defensive plays – Most online communities are happy as they are.  Help them hold onto that position of contentment, but they will still need a consistent flow of activities to keep them happy.

Special Teams – would be activities that have the ability to cause momentum shifts, increasing participation as well as building a stronger sense of community.

MY TURN TO SAY THANK YOU.

January 29, 2014 Leave a comment

Monday the 27th Jan is a normal day for most people unless you work in the community management environment.

This year the 27th was a Monday and this meant it wasCommunity Manager Appreciation Day

It’s the 5th year this has run.  And each year it gets bigger and bigger.  Who would have thought that 5 years ago there would be a 24 hour Google Hangout talking about community management?

I have been doing small things over the last few years since I came across #cmad.  It started with just saying thank you to some of the great facilitators that I worked with and has slowly got bigger.

Last year I was able to run a small event that included great presentations from Alan Boulter and Richard Millington which I made a little storify for.

But this year I was able to link up with the Knowledge and Innovation Network to do something slightly bigger.  No not a 24 hour hangout.  But a blended event online and offline bringing a range of different people to talk about how they run communities in their organisation and the tactics they use.

So a big thank you from me for making it such a great event goes out to Erica Hurley, Phil Ridout (Phil’s Skype account) and Dimple Rathod for the organisation.  Sarah Jennings and Liz Copeland for tweeting and helping to capture the day.

A special thank you to all the presenters:

Not forgetting all the people that participated in the day, face to face, online or via the webinars.

Hopefully next year we can make it bigger and spread the word even further about the importance of great community management.

Here’s this year’s Storify

Show your ap-pre-ci-a-tion

January 22, 2014 Leave a comment

It’s that time again.  For that one Monday in January we all say thank you to the facilitators of our communities during Community Manager Appreciation Day

Please take a moment to say thank you to those who put all the hard work in behind the scene to keep the communities that you participate in going. It’s not often they get thanks.  And just one thank you makes such a big difference.

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